WEEKLY HEALTH UPDATE

Week of: Monday, August 14, 2017
Courtesy of:

Chad Abramson, D.C.
(425) 315-6262

Mental Attitude:Radon Exposure May Increase Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

A new study that compared data concerning radon exposure and deaths attributed to Alzheimer's disease (AD) appears to indicate a correlation between ionizing radiation exposure and the development of this neurodegenerative condition. The authors of the study conclude, "Our findings, like other studies, suggest that ionizing radiation is a risk factor for AD. Intranasal inhalation of radon gas could subject the rhinencephalon and hippocampus to damaging radiation that initiates AD. The damage would accumulate over time, causing age to be a powerful risk factor." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, June 2017

Health Alert:Higher BMI Linked to Increased Risk Cardiometabolic Disease.

In a study that included 119,859 participants, researchers examined the association between body mass index (BMI) and cardiometabolic disease traits and found a link between a higher BMI and an increased risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. The researchers note, "Body mass index represents an important modifiable risk factor for ameliorating the risk of cardiometabolic disease in the general population." JAMA Cardiology, July 2017

Diet:Maternal High-Fat Diet Raises Breast Cancer Risk Across Generations.

A high-fat diet may increase the risk of breast cancer across generations. Using mice, researchers observed that first- and third-generation female offspring that had been exposed to a high-fat diet while in utero were at a greater risk of developing breast cancer. The findings suggest that a high-fat diet should be added to known causes of lifestyle-related breast cancer, which currently include alcohol consumption, lack of physical exercise, obesity, choice of contraceptives, hormone therapy, and not breast-feeding. Breast Cancer Research, July 2017

Exercise:Elderly Adults Who Exercise More May Live Longer.

Among a sample of 803 seniors participating in the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, researchers found that those who increased their physical activity levels over a ten-year period had a 43% lower risk of death during the course of the study than participants whose activity levels declined or remained unchanged. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, July 2017

Chiropractic:Spondylolysis Associated with Degenerative Joints in the Spine.

Spondylolysis is defined as a defect or stress fracture in the pars interarticularis of the vertebral arch. While the cause of spondylolysis is unknown, many factors are thought to contribute to its development. A recent study set out to determine the effects of this condition on the facet joints in the lumbar spine, which help make it possible to flex, twist, and bend. Researchers evaluated the radiographs of 107 patients with L5 spondylolysis and compared them with those of individuals without the condition and found that the patients with lumbar spondylolysis had more severe degenerative changes of the facet joints than those without spondylolysis. The findings suggest that individuals with spondylolysis are at a greater risk for developing degenerative joint issues in the lumbar spine. Clinical Spine Surgery, July 2017

Wellness/Prevention:Food Safety When Packing for a Picnic.

Picnicking can be a lot of fun, but nothing can ruin your outdoor meal faster than a case of food poisoning. To reduce your risk, the United States Department of Health & Human Services suggests: packing any meat, seafood, poultry, sandwiches, summer salads, fruit, vegetables, and dairy products in a cold cooler; fill the cooler with ice to help it stay colder longer; and store it in a shady spot. Department of Health & Human Services, June 2017

Quote:

"Champions have the courage to keep turning the pages because they know a better chapter lies ahead." ~ Paula White

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This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all health care concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a health care professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.