WEEKLY HEALTH UPDATE

Week of: Monday, October 25, 2021
Courtesy of:

Chad Abramson, D.C.
(425) 315-6262


Health Alert: Smartphones and Watches Can Pose Dangers to Pacemakers.

Researchers tested the magnetic field output of common smartphones and smart watches at varying distances from implanted heart devices and discovered that in close proximity (less than 6 inches), the magnetic fields of these devices were strong enough to potentially interfere with implanted defibrillators and pacemakers. Based on the findings, study author Dr. Seth Seidman notes, “[Patients should] take simple proactive and preventive measures, like keeping consumer electronics, such as certain cellphones and smart watches, six inches away from implanted medical devices and not carrying consumer electronics in a pocket over the medical device.” Heart Rhythm, August 2021

Diet: Eat More Leafy Greens!

A review of 24 meta-analyses concluded that increasing one’s intake of green leafy vegetables by 100 grams per day can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and early death by 25%. Food Chemistry, October 2021

Exercise: Starting Exercise Late in Life Still Offers Benefits.

Older coronary heart disease patients who became physically active after age 60 were 45% less likely to die during the following seven years than their peers who remained sedentary. European Society of Cardiology, August 2021

Chiropractic: Manual Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis.

An analysis of data from six randomized controlled trials and randomized crossover studies concluded that manual therapies—such as those provided by doctors of chiropractic—are effective for reducing pain and increasing function and range of motion in cases of osteoarthritis of the knee. Medicine, July 2021

Mental Attitude: Online Learning Boosts Sleep for Kids.

Poor sleep hygiene can negatively affect a child’s academic progress and overall wellbeing. A study that included 5,200 middle and high school students found that taking online classes can dramatically reduce the risk for insufficient sleep, especially if the teen can arrange their own schedule. Lead author Dr. Lisa Meltzer explains, “Without the required transportation time or time required to get ready for school in the morning, online students were able to wake later, and thus get more sleep.” Sleep, August 2021

Wellness/Prevention: Vitamin D Levels and PSA Trends.

For men under active surveillance for prostate cancer, those with higher initial vitamin D levels were two times more likely to see their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels trend downward. Urology, September 2021

Quote:

“It takes a very long time to become young.” ~ Pablo Picasso



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This information should not be substituted for medical or chiropractic advice. Any and all health care concerns, decisions, and actions must be done through the advice and counsel of a health care professional who is familiar with your updated medical history.